What to look for in Cut and Pressed Glass

Often times we are asked how was cut glass made and how is it different from pressed glass.  Four basic ways to tell them apart are listed here, but it takes much study to determine some pieces, so be sure to study pieces or do further research at your local library. 1. Cut glass usually has more sparkle due to the faceted cuts, which were hand done on most antique and older pieces. 2. Color can play a part, if the piece is extremely crystal clear, most likely it is cut, this is due to the lead in the glass.  Most pressed  glass has a dull appearance. 3. A piece of cut glass with have a sharp feel when you rub your hand over the item, it will almost feel like it could cut your skin.  Better crystal tends to have deeper cuts. 4. Weight is also a factor in determining cut versus pressed glass. Often heavier glass was used to make deeper cuts.  Pressed glass tends to have obvious seams from the mold that the glass was poured...

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Milk Bottle Centerpiece

A great idea for vintage milk bottles! This lovely milk bottle arrangement was put together for a wedding shower and also doubled as a favor for guests. Here are your Stagecoach Antiques DIY tips to turn this project into a fun centerpiece: Select the milk bottles Pick your favorite flowers or flowers to match your theme Accent with a ribbon and a few pebbles at the bottom of the bottle Place several on a glass cake stand and surround the edge with additional flower arrangements Surely a favor everyone will...

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How to Date your Porcelain or China Pattern by Backstamp

On the backside of your porcelain or china dishes, there may be a back stamp which is the manufactures mark. Many companies changed back stamps throughout years of production. There are even several different companies with the same name such as Haviland.  The Theodore Haviland pattern shown here is named Paradise, however, not all patterns are clearly marked on the...

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Matching your Porcelain and China Dish Patterns

When trying to match a porcelain or china pattern, if at all possible, bring in an actual piece, a photograph or a sketch of the front and back of the pattern. Throughout the years, there have been many different manufactures of dishes, including but not limited to, Haviland, Lenox, Syracuse, Spode, Wedgwood, Rosenthal, Mueller, Noritake, WS George, and Royal. These manufactures made 100’s of patterns, so if you come looking for a Haviland pattern with pink flowers, there will be more than...

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Identifying Antique Silver

Knowing the difference between silver plated items and sterling items can be very helpful when shopping to complete a flatware set or adding a special piece of hollow ware to your collection.   Shown here are examples of both sterling (marked 925 or sterling) and silver plate spoons.  There are many companies that made sterling and silver plates items, it is best to get a good reference book from your local library before you start collecting and have some knowledge. You can learn about  American sterling hallmarks from many sources. Some wonderful silver pieces are  silver plated. There is a price difference between sterling and silver...

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Finding the Right Key

When trying to locate a key to unlock a door or cabinet, please know that there are different styles and sizes of each.  All skeleton keys will not open all doors, it is best if you can bring your lock into the shop to try the keys.  To take your lock out, remove the knobs and unscrew the lockset, most locks should slide out of the door. As for cabinet or drawers keys, most of these have a hollow barrel. Cabinet keys tend to have a fancy design at the top.  If possible, please bring your drawer or lock from your drawer to check the keys we have in our inventory. Just as there are different keys for locks, there are different keys for your wind up clocks. As noted above, it is always best to bring your item along, in this case, your...

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